Dealing with a bad day

We all have a bad workout day.
A day were the bar just seems heavier then usual.
Most drudge through the haphazard workout and plan on making
up for it on the next one.

Next time it happens, try this.
Pick two large movements.
For example: Kettlebell or dumbbell swings
and some kind of deadlift variations.
Do a circuit and make short max (10 min) and intense.
You are more likely to crush the workout,
and you can be guilt free. Not that you should feel any.

Another thing I do is I note down my mood,
nutrition and sleep even weather.
And soon I can see why I am not up to the workout.
Now I can make conscious effort to avoid things that mess me up.

If you are having “bad workouts” frequently I suggest you do this.

Lack of sleep, being sick or injures are usually things out of our control.
You just have to roll with it.
BUT
Staying up late to watch TV, eating crappy food, having a few drinks
or being stressed are all things you can actively avoid.

Now for the difficult part.

Ask your self.
Am I making up excuses and putting up mental barricades.

Oh it’s so gray outside and raining of course I’m tired.
It’s been a long day, it’s ok to take it easy.
It’s going to be a long day, I need to take it easy.

IT’S ALL TOTAL BULLSHIT!

If you need a restday take one, that’s fine but ALWAYS crush the workout.

Train for life

Choosing a trainer.

When choosing a trainer the inclination is,
“he’s ripped and fit he must be good”
He did it, he can teach me to do it, right.

Well the thing is that he could have great genetics.
Be naturally athletic and coordinated, meaning he learned
The movements fast and easy. And builds muscle easily.

And the truth is many personal trainers have no hands on experience
Training when they start, they pass a test and think now I have learned
All I need to learn.

I was one of them.

When people are natural at something they don’t go through
A learning phase, they acquire skill to easily.
and therefore have a hard time teaching the movements to “regular” people.
They never learned any teaching cues.

Make sure your trainer is someone who has worked
on his or her skill, that way he is better suited to teach it to others.
I found this out the hard way.

For me it was frustrating when I was trying to teach movements
In boxing and lifting.
I had learned by watching and doing.
Why can’t you. Arghhh!!!

The fix.

I finally realized this when coach deconstructed my movements,
he said “you learned to squat on your own didn’t you.
You do it well but it so instinctual that you can’t break it up into it’s basics”.

That’s it I thought, I learned a movement so easily that I
Expected everyone else to get it easily too.
That’s why I dove into Olympic lifts and kettle bell movements with different coaches.
Threw away my ego and started my schooling all over again.

Starting from scratch I learned all my lifts again taking in all the
teaching cues and developing my own on the way.
By now I had been training others for four years.

I now go on a regular basis to different coaches and start again.
With all my movements in both lifting and boxing.
I always take something new away from it
and it makes me a better coach.

If I get too comfortable with something I drop it for a while.
Then going to a coach and get him to teach it to me as if I was a novice.
It’s humbling and hard on the ego and necessary for everyone.

Stay away from “I know it all” people and certainly don’t become one.

Train for life

When in doubt, run.

People tend to over think what workout paradigm is the best for them and their goals.
What should I do to burn fat, build muscle, get lean, get fit etc
Unsurprisingly the search for the right way leaves them frustrated and no steps are taken as a result and excuses pile up.
Getting fit, strong and healthy is not complicated. Here is a start point.
RUN
Running something everyone should do. I am not talking marathon here. Start with a mile for time then try to beat that time, then add 20 pushups and 20 squats and beat the time again, then add a 5-10lb rucksack.
This increases work capacity and athleticism and I find that it strengthens mentality when you are fighting that voice in your head that is telling you to quit and go home.
Run for 5 min or go for a set distance and do a set of bodyweight squats, lunges, jumps, push and pullups or whatever you can think of, do this for 30 min or 2 miles, keep it short, intense and don’t over think just work your butt of and this will get you crazy results in a short time.
As a bonus you can do an awesome workout in 20-30 min and short intense sets have been shown to increase lean muscle and burn fat fast.
If running a mile is too much then do a 1min jog-1min walk for a set time or distance until you can jog a mile.
On my rest days I usually go for a 2-5mile run and do a bunch of bodyweight exercises enroute. If I find stones or logs I lift them, do pullups in monkey bars and swings, few sprints here and there depending how I feel.
Stick to the basics and work hard.

Train for life

Sled drag and bodyweight

Riverside park has an awesome sandpit and traveling rings. I took my boy Matt (a high altitude climber) down there to shake him up after the holiday coma:) After a good warmup (it was around -3 Celcius) we did a tag team workout of 80lb Sled drag alternating forward and backwards while the other did a bodyweight circuit. Did three rounds adding to the sled distance each round, other doing as many rounds as possible of 8 reps each: Mixed Pushups, mixgrip pullups, squats and lungejump. We finished with a 1 mile run. The “sled” is a old sandbag that I tie a rope on.

Sled drag aprox
150 yards
300 yards
450 yards